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Monday, October 12, 2009

Smoking laws work - Study.

Quick excerpt here from a 2001 study that proves tobacco laws reduce smoking. This is damn old. We're getting better at it. The source site is also great for other South African public health statistics.

Tobacco consumption declines
by Mokgadi Pela
2001-03-16

Tobacco consumption in South Africa has fallen for eight consecutive years since 1991, a meeting to discuss the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control heard in Sandton, Johannesburg, on the 12th of March. Delivering the keynote address, Dr Derek Yach, of the World Health Organisation, said this was a result of sustained tobacco control measures. He said in 1998-99 more than 30 billion cigarettes were released for consumption, down by 17 percent from the 36 billion released in 1993-94. The work of public health advocates in South Africa thrived. Led by Health Minister Manto Tshabalala-Msimang, South Africa's tobacco control story is now a shining example for the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control of public excellence and political courage. The 11th World Conference on Tobacco held last year in Chicago saluted this leadership with an award recognising her exemplary courage, Yach said. Crucially, the declines have been most significant among the poorest and the youngest groups in the country. New laws banning smoking in public places and the complete ban on tobacco advertising and promotion, which is being incrementally introduced this year, are likely to push the rates down even faster, he added. Yach dismissed claims that tobacco control would lead to job losses. (Source: Sowetan, 13 March 2001)

Tobacco consumption in South Africa has fallen for eight consecutive years since 1991, a meeting to discuss the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control heard in Sandton, Johannesburg, on the 12th of March. Delivering the keynote address, Dr Derek Yach, executive director of non-communicable diseases and menial health at the World Health Organisation, said this was a result of sustained tobacco control measures.

He said in 1998-99 more than 30 billion cigarettes were released for consumption, down by 17 percent from the 36 billion released in 1993-94. The work of public health advocates in South Africa thrived. Led by Health Minister Manto Tshabalala-Msimang, South Africa's tobacco control story is now a shining example for the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control of public excellence and political courage. The 11th World Conference on Tobacco held last year in Chicago saluted this leadership with an award recognising her exemplary courage, Yach said.

Crucially, the declines have been most significant among the poorest and the youngest groups in the country. New laws banning smoking in public places and the complete ban on tobacco advertising and promotion, which is being incrementally introduced this year, are likely to push the rates down even faster, he added. Yach dismissed claims that tobacco control would lead to job losses.

We know from economists around the world that far from causing job losses, people who stop smoking will spend their money on other goods and services, resulting in an increase in employment in those sectors. We know what works in South Africa will work in many other countries, Yach said.

Speaking at the same forum. Tshabalala-Msimang said her department would tighten the laws controlling smoking to ensure that everyone has an environment that's not harmful to their well-being. She said the tobacco industry had shown they'll use any loophole to protect their product. We will also find all the gaps and close them.

Tshabalala-Msimang urged participating nations to pass laws that would ensure that the youth and all vulnerable groups were protected from the harmful effects of smoking.


Source: Sowetan, 13 March 2001

2 comments:

Marion said...

I guess you're right. We really have to stop smoking. I know that laws banning smoking exist, but there's this part of me that keeps me wanting to go on. I'm feeling the effects already. My coughs don't go away easily these days, and the color of my teeth is changing. A dentist in Rotterdam said that smoking can really damage your teeth. It could be considered as stress relief, but when you think about the stress when the effects of smoking come out, that's a different story.

I have to listen to these dentists. Rotterdam's dentists are really convincing their patients to stop smoking, not just for their own health, but for the health of others, too.

şirinler türkçe dublaj izle said...

Nice post, thank you.

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